Algonquin Arts Press Releases
Algonquin Arts Press Releases
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 26, 2014
For More Information
Contact David Applegate
(732) 528-3735 or david@algonquinarts.org

Walnut Street Theatre's Acclaimed Production Of Driving Miss Daisy Pulls Into Manasquan March 7 & 8

Philadelphia Theatre's National Tour Presents Alfred Uhry's Pulitzer Prize and Academy Award Winning Story

EVENT INFORMATION
Driving Miss Daisy

Date & Time:
Friday, March 7 – 8 p.m.
Saturday, March 8 – 2 p.m.

Location:
Algonquin Arts Theatre
173 Main Street, Manasquan, N.J.

Tickets:
Premium: Sold Out
Regular: $34 (Adults), $31 (Seniors), $22 (Students)
Algonquin Arts Box Office: 732-528-9211 or algonquinarts.org
All tickets subject to $2 per ticket fee.

Image: http://www.algonquinarts.org/cc/Daisy_MarkGarvin_CMYK.jpg
Wendy Scharfman and Johnnie Hobbs star with Bill Van Horn (not pictured) in Walnut Street Theatre's production of Driving Miss Daisy at the Algonquin on March 7 & 8. Photo by Mark Garvin.

MANASQUAN, N.J. (Feb. 26, 2014) – Philadelphia's famous Walnut Street Theatre brings its national tour of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play "Driving Miss Daisy" to Algonquin Arts Theatre for two performances on March 7 & 8.

Alfred Uhry's classic play is a funny, timeless, searing, and ultimately hopeful meditation on growing old, relationships, and loyalty. This iconic tale of pride, changing times and the transformative power of friendship has warmed the hearts of millions.

"'Driving Miss Daisy' pulls you in and touches the heart," said Broadwayworld.com in a review of this production before it embarked on tour.

In addition to its Pulitzer, the film version of this beautiful story, starring Morgan Freeman and Jessica Tandy, won multiple Academy Awards including the Oscar for Best Picture.

A trio of experienced actors make up what director Bernard Havard call "his dream cast." Wendy Scharfman plays the title character, Miss Daisy Werthan; Bill Van Horn ("Proof") returns to the Algonquin play her son Boolie Werthan; and Johnnie Hobbs Jr. takes care of the driving as Chauffeur Hoke Coleburn. Each performance will include a post-show question and answer session with the cast.

On Friday, March 7 curtain time is at 8 p.m., and the Saturday, March 8, performance starts at 2 p.m.

Regular seating is $34 for adults with discounts for students and seniors. Purchase online at algonquinarts.org, by calling 732-528-9211 or by stopping in to the box office at 173 Main Street from 12-6 p.m. on weekdays or 12-4 p.m. on Saturday. Tickets are subject to $2 processing fees. "Driving Miss Daisy" is recommended for audiences 13 and up.

Set against the backdrop of the Civil Rights Era in Atlanta following World War II, the play tells the story of Miss Daisy and her newly hired Chauffeur Hoke. Although Miss Daisy lives a life of privilege while Hoke lives the life of an African-American man in the days of Jim Crow, they discover they have much in common and have some laughs along the way.

Their relationship, spanning a 25 year period, is a reflection of critical changes in American society. Daisy and Hoke deal with anti-Semitism, racism, and class differences while their bond grows ever stronger. Full of wit and charm, Miss Daisy and Hoke take audiences on an unforgettable journey.

Founded in 1809, Walnut Street Theatre is the oldest continuously operating theatre in the United States. For more than 200 years, this venerable institution has stood the test of time to become a staple of Philadelphia's, and for that matter, America’s cultural community.

In the 1940s, the theatre was home to many pre-Broadway try-outs of plays that would go on to become American classics, such as A Streetcar Named Desire starring Marlon Brando, A Raisin in the Sun featuring Sydney Poitier, and The Diary of Anne Frank featuring Susan Strasberg.

Its grand stage has housed a remarkably wide range of entertainment and national events, including circus, opera, vaudeville, lectures, music, dance, motion pictures, live theatre and even the first televised Presidential Debate between Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter.

"Driving Miss Daisy" marks Walnut Street's fourth national tour, following "The Glass Menagerie," "Proof," and "Around the World in 80 Days," and second national tour ("Proof") with a stop at Algonquin Arts Theatre.

About Algonquin Arts Theatre:
Algonquin Arts Theatre (AAT) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization founded in 1992 with the mission to provide cultural enhancement and arts education to all audiences at the Jersey Shore through high-quality performances and programs in theatre, music, film and dance. The end goal is to foster appreciation of the arts and promote lifelong learning, particularly among underserved audiences including the economically disadvantaged, senior citizens and individuals with disabilities.

Algonquin Arts Theatre's programs are made possible in part by funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts / Department of State, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts; by funds from the Paul F. Zito, M.D. Educational Foundation, by Simon Kaufman, Esq. & Maria Zito-Kaufman and the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation.